MENU

Fake News


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story







By Cami Benson and Oliver Cubillos

Students spend much of their free time scrolling through social media and reading news articles, but many of the articles they read are fake. Fake news articles and organizations have been thriving off of this constant intake of online news. A recent study by researchers at Stanford found that the majority of teens can’t distinguish between real news and fake news. Although many teens have trouble with this, media literacy is not a requirement for any English or Social Studies class at Mira Costa. Visit this resource to learn more about distinguishing between real and fake news. The graphic below may be useful for teens to help decide on whether or not a certain news organization is factual or trustworthy.

 

Screen Shot 2017-11-12 at 3.32.49 PM

Leave a Comment

Comments are closed.

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Fake News

    News

    Link Crew 2017-2018

  • Fake News

    Fall

    Refuse to Lose

  • Fake News

    News

    Flexing For a Grade

  • Fake News

    News

    FAFSA Draft

  • Fake News

    News

    Teenage Political Activism

  • Fake News

    News

    Parcel Tax

  • Fake News

    News

    Dress Code

  • Fake News

    News

    School Technology

  • Fake News

    News

    Don’t Hate, Debate

  • Fake News

    News

    Embracing The L

The Student News Site of Mira Costa High School
Fake News